1977

1977 is here! It’s my new book, a collage of poems and charts and maps that re-creates the feeling I had when I first heard punk music.

You can be first to have a copy by heading over the Ravenna Press and buy online here. Or …

Those of you who can make it to the release party 4/21 may want to wait … the first 77 get a bonus cassette and poster that evening when you buy a copy from the author.  #merchandising

Thanks for supporting small presses and independent bookstores!

Mix Tape
I have a tape I’d like to play for you …

“What does it mean?” Context is a landscape for understanding. Music often triggers memories of place and time. Collage forces contradictions to confront each other. Dice and loop put things together to make something new.

e.g., my poems on 1977 Mix Tape are provided context and additional meaning  by collaborator James Nugent. Listen or download for free at SoundCloud or Bandcamp.

Smashes history, both textbook and memory, into fragments and then reassembles it into an anti-chronological “narrative” (in quotes), this collage of memoir, charts and sampled text is tied together by the thinnest of threads for the reader to pull or be pulled by.

Taking nostalgia to its root in battle and sickness, the writer/illustrator challenges the notion that time that has passed between then and now.

If I had to sum this up in one word, I couldn’t.

 

1977
Cover art for 1977 coming from Ravenna Press in April 2018. Design by Jack Burgess.

1977
Cover art for 1977 coming from Ravenna Press in April 2018. Design by Jack Burgess.

Fired up! Here’s the cover art for my next book 1977. Big thanks to my son Jack for another great design! Thanks too to Ravenna Press, who will be publishing the collection of drawings and poems this April.

1977 is about history and memory, about revising and forgetting. 1977 is about how I was a hippie and became a punk. 1977 is about the year I bought my first punk LPs at the House of Guitars.  1977 is about capturing that feeling we had.

Chart Gender Punk Bands

Chart shows the gender make-up of punk bands that I listened to c. 1977. You could count the women musicians on one hand — Moe Tucker, Patti Smith, Deborah Harry, Tina Weymouth. Later I heard the Slits (1979) and the Go-Gos (early 1980s ). In the 1990s my daughter showed me the light with Sleater-Kinney, The Gossip, Bratmobile, Bikini Kill. Punk got better over the years!